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A STUDY ON SANCTIFICATION THAT BUILDS ON THE INFLUENTIAL TEACHING OF WILLIAM H. DURHAM (AD 1873-1912), PART 7

by Karl Kemp  
4/17/2019 / Bible Studies


Here in Part 7 of this paper we continue the study under section 11.3 ("Now I'll List a Large Number of Passages [Passages that Are Listed, Quoted at Least to Some Extent, and Discussed in this Section along with the Passages Listed above in Section 11.2] that Demonstrate that the All-Important Sanctifying/Making Righteous Work of the Righteous, Holy Spirit Is Very Much Included in God's Promised Pouring Out of His Spirit in New-Covenant Salvation") with a nine-page discussion under 1 Corinthians 12:12-13. This study with the strong emphasis on sanctification/holiness and victory over sin through new-covenant salvation is finished here in Part 7.

1 Corinthians 12:12-13. For even as the body [referring to the human physical body] is one and yet has many members [with each different member having different functions to perform, each of them being important to the proper functioning of the body], and all the members of the body, though they are many, are one body, so also is Christ. [Compare Rom. 12:4, 5; 1 Cor. 10:17; and 12:13-27. "So also is Christ" means so also is the Body of Christ, the church. The apostle is emphasizing the unity of all Christians (the unity that is supposed to exist, and will exist to the extent all Christians believe the truth and live in line with the truth by the Holy Spirit) in the one Body (by the plan of God), as he does in the following verses.] (13) [I have nine pages of discussion here discussing this verse and baptism in the Spirit and water baptism before we come to the next passage listed under subsection 11.3 of this paper (2 Corinthians 1:22).] For by one Spirit [I would translate "For in one Spirit," with the margin of the NASB. The Greek preposition en, which Paul used here, is most often translated "in." There are six other verses in the New Testament that speak of baptism in the Spirit (Matt. 3:11; Mark 1:8; Luke 3:16; John 1:33; Acts 1:5; and 11:16). All these verses use en, and I would translate in for each of these verses.] we were all [all true Christians] baptized [or, immersed] into [or, better yet, "baptized [or, immersed] resulting in"] one body, whether Jews or Greeks, whether slaves or free [[(This double bracket continues for six paragraphs.) Compare Gal. 3:28; Eph. 2:13-19. I believe baptism (or, immersion) in the Spirit here, as with the other six uses of this terminology in the New Testament, includes the new birth, the sanctifying work of the Spirit, and the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work. The more typical viewpoint among Pentecostals and charismatics is that baptism in the Spirit is a second experience that is separate from, and does not include, the new birth. And for many it does not include the sanctifying work of the Spirit. It is true that in our day many Christians enter the charismatic dimension as a second experience, but one of the main reasons this happens is that so many Christians (including many evangelicals) have omitted the charismatic dimension from Christianity. (This was obviously totally widespread when the modern Pentecostal movement began in the late 1800s and early 1900s.) 

When we finally learn that this dimension is still part of the new covenant (often we learn this many years after we were born again), we can enter this dimension through a second experience, an experience that could and should have been part of our becoming Christians in the first place (according to the New Testament pattern). ((This double parenthesis continues for three paragraphs.) See footnote 30 on pages 135-138 of my book Holiness and Victory Over Sin, starting with the last paragraph on page 137. There I also discuss the fact that many Christians learn long after their conversion that the Bible teaches that Christians are called, and enabled, to walk in righteousness and holiness with the victory over sin (in the ideal over all sin, including everything that God would consider to be sin for us). Such persons may then enter (by faith) this dimension of the work of the Holy Spirit through a definite second experience that could be called a baptism in the Spirit (and some of them used that terminology for the second experience). I'm not putting any emphasis on an experience that sanctifies. The emphasis is on our appropriating by faith on a continuous basis what God the Father has made available by grace (at a very high price to His Son and Himself).  

It is also true that some Christians, although they have known what the Bible teaches about righteousness and holiness, do not submit (in faith) in any full sense to this dimension of the Spirit's work until later. Holiness is a big part of what baptism in the Spirit is all about. What we need is the end result of Christians walking in holiness on a continuous basis, whether there is a definite second (crisis) experience or not. Like William H. Durham and A. S. Copley (both discussed earlier in this paper) taught, holiness and victory over sin is available to Christians from the time we become Christians. But this doesn't mean that the victory will be automatic or always easy. We must wage warfare, by grace through faith, against the world, the flesh (the old man/sinful nature), and the devil and his hosts.  

Many holiness churches teach holiness as a second work of grace (of the Spirit) that is separate from, and typically later than, becoming born-again Christians. From my point of view, they are making a mistake very similar to that of most Pentecostals and charismatics. Holiness is a big part of what Christianity and baptism in the Holy Spirit is all about. We should not think of Christianity apart from holiness (or apart from the charismatic dimension). Anyway, I am thankful that holiness churches help us see that Christians are called, and enabled, to walk in holiness by the grace/Spirit of God, even as I am thankful that Pentecostals and charismatics help us see that the charismatic dimension of the work of the Spirit is still for us today.)) We need is an abiding walk in holiness and the charismatic dimension. 

Entering the charismatic dimension is part of what baptism in the Spirit means in the New Testament, an important part, but the new birth and the sanctifying work of the Holy Spirit are more important parts of what baptism in the Spirit means in the New Testament. It causes confusion to speak of a second experience where Christians enter the charismatic dimension the baptism in the Spirit. It seems to me that it should not be very difficult for Pentecostals and charismatics to modify their viewpoint regarding baptism in the Spirit. They would not really be giving up anything. It is true, of course, that they must first be convinced that this modified viewpoint more accurately reflects what the Scriptures teach. As a young Christian and charismatic, I spent a lot of hours over a ten-year period considering this topic, seeking God for the balanced truth.

The apostle's emphasis here in 1 Cor. 12:13 is clearly on unity in the one body of Christ. Even those who are far from being united in the natural - Jews and Gentiles; slaves and free; etc. - are united in Christ. It is true, of course, that this unity will not be manifested to the extent that Christians do not know and submit in faith to this gospel truth; we must walk by the Spirit through faith for this reality to be manifested. The apostle emphasized this aspect of gospel truth to the church at Corinth because they were lacking in unity; there was much strife and disunity, as this epistle to the Corinthians demonstrates.]], and were all made to drink of the one Spirit. [Compare John 7:37-39. We all receive/drink of the one life-giving, sanctifying Spirit, and we all invited to receive/drink of the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work, that are made available to us in the one Spirit. On the word one, see under 1 Cor. 12:4 (in my paper on 1 Corinthians chapters 12-14 on my internet site; Google to Karl Kemp Teaching); with this word Paul is again emphasizing the unity we are to have in the one body of Christ.

I'll quote part of what Gordon Fee said under this verse. [First Epistle to the Corinthians (Eerdmans, 1987), pages 599-600. Fee is a well-respected Pentecostal scholar.] In his discussion of this verse, Fee has already stated that he believes that baptism in the one Spirit, which was spoken of earlier in this verse, means essentially the same thing as being made to drink of the one Spirit here at the end of this verse. (We at least are enabled to drink of the one Spirit from the time we are immersed in the Spirit.) Fee then says, "... Most likely [with the expressions [baptism in the one Spirit and being made to drink of the one Spirit]...Paul is referring to their common experience of conversion, and he does so in terms of its most crucial ingredient, the receiving of the Spirit. Such expressive metaphors (immersion in the Spirit and drinking to the fill of the Spirit)...imply a much greater experiential and visibly manifest reception of the Spirit than many have tended to experience in subsequent church history....

If this is the correct understanding of these two clauses, and the full context seems to demand such, then the prepositional phrase 'in the Spirit' is most likely locative [meaning the Greek preposition en is to be translated "in," as Fee goes on to show], expressing the 'element' in which they have all been immersed, just as the Spirit is that which they have all been given to drink. Such usage is also in keeping with the rest of the NT."]]

I'll quote part of what I said in my paper on 1 Corinthians chapters 12-14 under the heading "Further Discussion on the Meaning of the Words Baptism in the Holy Spirit in the New Testament," which starts on page 35 of the original version of the paper, and page 36 of the internet version of the paper [Google to Karl Kemp Teaching]:

"It seems that most Pentecostals and charismatics still hold the viewpoint that (the) baptism in the Spirit refers to an experience completely separate from (and typically subsequent to) the new birth. As noted above, I believe baptism in the Spirit, as these words are used in the New Testament (and the other expressions that are used in the New Testament that have essentially the same meaning, like receiving the gift of the Spirit) very much include the new birth and the sanctifying work of the Holy Spirit. The excerpt that I included above under 1 Cor. 12:13 from Gordon Fee (a Pentecostal scholar who is well respected as an expert in New Testament exegesis) shows that he and I are in essential agreement on this point.     

There are at least two reasons why Pentecostals and charismatics need to reconsider this topic. For one thing, it always is important for Christians to seek God for the balanced truth of what the Bible teaches. I have observed over the years that if we do not make finding the balanced truth a top priority item, we probably will not find it. The world, the flesh, and the devil are against us; if we do not make God and His truth a top priority, we will frequently fall short of the balanced truth. (The same thing is true regarding His righteousness, holiness, etc.)

One major problem is that most Christians assume they already have the balanced truth. How could they possibly fall short of the balanced truth? Has their church not taught it this way for a long time? Surely their church could not be wrong - has God not blessed them; has God not favored them with gifts of the Spirit; has God not used them to help many? Just because God has blessed us and used us is no guarantee that we have everything right. If God only blessed and used those Christians that have everything right, He would not be using many Christians, or blessing many. Thank you Father for your mercy! And thank you for correcting us where we need to be corrected!

A second reason why Pentecostals and charismatics need to reconsider this topic is that the most common viewpoint among us is one of the most divisive issues in the body of Christ in our day. Unnecessary divisions in the body of Christ are a serious problem, but it is also true that this inadequate viewpoint regarding baptism in the Spirit tends to close the ears of the rest of the body of Christ to the important things they can and should learn from us."

I'll include several excerpts from the 1988 book Treasures Old and New: Interpretations of "Spirit-Baptism" in the Charismatic Renewal Movement by Henry I. Lederle (Hendrickson Publishers), 264 pages. I found this book to be informative and helpful. Dr. Lederle (who taught at the University of South Africa at the time he wrote this book) informs us in the Preface that his "vivid charismatic experience" in 1980 overturned his doctrinal apple-cart in that he was a seminary graduate "with a Reformed [Calvinistic] background with both evangelical and ecumenical roots." I am substantially abbreviating the quotations from Lederle for this internet version of the paper.

I'll include two excerpts from the Introduction. "In the sixties and seventies...a new religious awakening made its influence felt in Christianity. [I became a born-again Christian in the spring of 1964. Later that year I became aware of the Pentecostal/charismatic viewpoint, and by the spring of 1966 I had become involved in the charismatic renewal. I taught entering into the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work as a second experience for several years.] The charismatic renewal movement spread across the globe in less than a decade reaching all five continents, most Christian denominations of Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox heritage, and the lives of some sixty million people. ... The focus of this study is on...the doctrine of Spirit-baptism" (page xi).  ...

I'll continue to quote from Lederle for the next page and a half. "... [Lederle mentions that Gordon Fee (I quoted from Fee, a well-respected Pentecostal New Testament scholar, above under 1 Cor. 12:13) had argued in 1972 that the words baptism in the Spirit in the New Testament do not refer to an experience subsequent to salvation.]   

Fee states that experience generally precedes hermeneutics [interpretation] among Pentecostals [The Pentecostals are not the only ones who have this problem]: 'In a sense, the Pentecostal tends to exegete his experience [instead of the New Testament]. For example, the doctrine of Spirit-baptism as distinct from and subsequent to conversion did not flow naturally out of his reading of Scripture.' ... Fee considers the crucial point to be the experiential, dynamic quality of life in the Spirit: 'Everywhere for Luke [who wrote Acts] it is the presence of the Spirit that signifies the "real thing." ....' " Lederle's two quotations from Fee were taken from "Hermeneutics and Historical Precedent: A Major Problem in Pentecostal Hermeneutics," in "Perspectives on the New Pentecostalism," ed. R. P. Spittler [Baker, 1976], pages 122, 131.

On page 32 Lederle mentions that Fee was influenced by James Dunn (I'll quote from Dunn later in this section), a "Reformed New Testament scholar...who is a sympathetic critic with participant-observer experience in charismatic groups in England." 

"My basic contention [I'm quoting Lederle] is that the term [baptism in the Spirit] is being incorrectly applied and used today [in Pentecostal and charismatic circles], but the experience it refers to is a perfectly valid experience" (page 66). On page 65 Lederle commented that he is "not against speaking of various 'entries' or 'comings' of the Spirit once the two-stage grid has been disposed of." [This is important!] ...

"...this study contends the heartbeat of the charismatic contribution to Christianity at large is not Spirit-baptism but the acknowledging of the dimension of the Spirit which is experientially manifested in spiritual gifts or charisms. ..." (page 216).

"... [The charismatic renewal] lies in vibrant, expectant faith; openness to the Holy Spirit and the wide range of his gifts; and a refusal to deny the experiential aspect of Christianity in order to appease rationalistic Western culture. [For many "Christians" it very much includes coming to an understanding of the gospel and salvation (including the new birth) through Christ Jesus for the first time. Many see for the first time that the Bible really is God's Word and that it is alive.] ... The charismatic renewal is a revival, a spiritual awakening, which needs to revitalize, energize, disturb and renew the contemporary expressions of the faith of the church. There are attempts in some circles to domesticate the charismatic renewal - to 'tame' it so that it amounts to roughly the same as traditional Christianity" (page 230).

Now I'll include several excerpts from James D. G. Dunn, who is a New Testament scholar from England (Baptism in the Holy Spirit [SCM Press, Ltd. 1970, published in the U.S.A. by the Westminster Press], 248 pages). I do not know much about Dunn, and I do not agree with everything he says in this book, but I consider the overall teaching of the book to be quite important and quite perceptive, and I highly recommend this book. Throughout this book Dunn analyzes the many passages of the New Testament that are relevant to his topic(s). I am substantially abbreviating the quotations from Dunn for this internet version of the paper.

First I'll include an excerpt from the Introduction. "I hope to show that for the writers of the NT the baptism in or gift of the Spirit was part of the event (or process) of becoming a Christian, together with the effective proclamation of the Gospel, belief in ([Greek preposition] eis) Jesus as Lord, and water-baptism in the name of the Lord Jesus; ... only those who had thus received the Spirit could be called Christians; that the reception of the Spirit was a very definite and often dramatic experience, the decisive and climatic experience in conversion-initiation.... We shall see that while the Pentecostal's belief in the dynamic and experiential nature of Spirit-baptism is well founded, his separation of it from conversion-initiation is wholly unjustified.... ...

We shall see that the baptism in the Spirit from the start was understood as an initiatory experience.... The Pentecostal doctrine is built chiefly on Acts, but a detailed study will reveal that for the writer of Acts [Luke] in the last analysis it is only by receiving the Spirit that one becomes a Christian..." (pages 4, 5).

I'll include an excerpt from his chapter titled "Conversion-Initiation in the Acts of the Apostles." "... What the Pentecostal attempts to separate into two works of God is in fact one single divine act [not that all the ingredients of this "single divine act" come together instantaneously]. ... Faith would not justify [Dunn is using the word "justify" in the (very important) full sense that includes the transformation to righteousness by the Spirit] if God did not give his Spirit. Faith is only the reaching out of an empty hand to receive; it is what is received which alone ultimately counts" (page 96).

I'll quote from pages 135, 136 of Dunn's chapter XI, in which he deals with Paul's Corinthian letters. Dunn is commenting here on the third chapter of 2 Corinthians. ...

And I'll quote what he said under verse 8. "Christianity exists in a completely new dispensation; Christians live in a time that is wholly different and miraculous - the time of the End. This is because, and only because they have the Spirit. This is also the dispensation of righteousness (v. 9), which confirms what we have already concluded from Gal. 3: that possession of righteousness and possession of life = the Spirit, are synonymous (Gal. 3:21). [I had a footnote: "I discussed Gal. 3:21, which is a very important verse, on page 39 of The Christian, the Law, and Legalism and on pages 103, 104 of the Paper on Faith. (Both papers are on my internet site.) I agree that the heart of new-covenant salvation is having life by the Spirit, and that those who have life by the Spirit are enabled (and required) to live in righteousness by the life/Spirit of God through Christ Jesus and His atoning death, which is what Dunn is saying, if I understand him.] ...." And I'll quote part of what he said later regarding 2 Corinthians chapter 3. "... ...it is impossible to conceive of the new covenant apart from the Spirit, and impossible to experience the blessings of the new covenant apart from the indwelling of the Spirit." ...

In his following paragraphs Dunn discusses water-baptism, which he deals with quite a bit in this book since it is part of conversion-initiation as it is presented in the New Testament. Dunn argues that in the New Testament water-baptism, which was (typically) preparatory for receiving the Holy Spirit, was not optional. "The NT writers would to a man reject any separation of the decisive moment of faith...from [water] baptism...by way of putting the act of faith prior to [water] baptism, thereby reducing [water] baptism to a mere symbol.... Baptism properly performed is for the NT essentially the act of faith and repentance..." (page 227). That is, water-baptism is the appropriate NT occasion to complete the transaction of entering into salvation through union with Christ Jesus and His atoning death through repentance and faith. Dunn is not suggesting that there was no faith before being baptized in water, but that the faith transaction is not completed (based on the typical New Testament pattern) before submitting to the Lord Jesus Christ and His atoning death in water baptism. Most Christians I know do not agree with Dunn's viewpoint, but I believe he is mostly right (right, that is, in explaining what the New Testament says) on water-baptism.

Most Christians I know hold the viewpoint that the faith transaction is completed with a sinner's prayer (asking for forgiveness, inviting Christ into the heart, and, hopefully [sadly, this (along with repentance) is often skipped in our day], submitting to His Lordship). They believe that, at that time, the most important work takes place - they become born-again Christians. Most of them believe that the convert should eventually be baptized in water, in obedience to Christ, but they do not expect anything significant to take place at that time in that the all-important transformation has already taken place (their sins have been washed away; they have been born again; the Spirit of God has come to dwell in them; and they have the power to begin to live for God [For most this does not include the idea that we are called, and enabled, to walk with the victory over everything that God would consider to be sin for us]).

I am quite sure that this procedure can (and often does) produce acceptable results (this is pretty much what happened to me and to most of the Christians I fellowship with), assuming that the converts really understand the basics of the gospel and really submit to the gospel in faith (including repentance), and assuming that they are committed to press on in faith (by the grace of God), building their lives on the Word of God and truly being committed to the Lordship of Christ. It is, of course, also very important that the convert be part of a church that is committed to God and His Word. I am also quite sure that we will achieve better results if we come into better alignment with the balanced truth of what the New Testament teaches regarding water baptism. Furthermore, Christians can unite around the balanced truth. Anyway, the primary thing I am concerned about is the gigantic need for the victory over sin by grace through faith.

I discussed water baptism on page 126 of Holiness and Victory Over Sin (see the footnotes too) and see under 1 Cor. 15:29 on pages 7-9 of the internet version of my paper on 1 Corinthians chapter 15; I'll quote part of what I said there (in that paper): "It's clear to me that the Bible teaches a higher view of [water] baptism than that held by many Christians today. I'm not bringing this up because I think this is one of the biggest problems in the Body of Christ. (I believe we have much greater problems to deal with in the Body of Christ, especially dealing with the basic truths of the gospel and the need to live in God's will - in righteousness and holiness - by grace/the Spirit through faith.) Furthermore, I'm not bringing up water baptism because of some special interest in this topic, or because of some special experience I've had; I'm not emotionally involved regarding this topic and I'm not obligated to any particular viewpoint (we are obligated to God and His truth). I'm bringing it up strictly based on what the Bible seems to rather clearly say on this topic. I'm certainly not suggesting, nor do I believe, that people can't be saved or sanctified apart from water baptism. God has been very generous with His people (in blessing us in spite of our errors), but that's no excuse to maintain our viewpoints when they're wrong/when they don't line up with the balanced truth of what the Bible teaches. The more we do things God's way, the more He'll be glorified, His will will be accomplished in the Body of Christ, the more He can bless us and use us, and the more we can unite around the balanced truth.

It seems that many have formed their view of water baptism mostly in reaction to someone else who was out of balance in a different direction [for example, against the viewpoint of baptismal regeneration or the viewpoint that it is impossible to be born again before being baptized in water]. We need the balanced truth of what the Bible teaches in this area, as in every area. The Bible mentions forgiveness/washing away of sins at water baptism (Acts 2:38, 22:16); it mentions becoming united with Christ in baptism, including being united with Him in His death on the cross (cf. Gal. 3:27; Rom. 6:3); He died an atoning death in our place; we are to die to sin and to the old man in water baptism, and the old man is to be buried (Rom. 6:3, 4; Col. 2:11, 12); John 3:5 seems to speak of water baptism as a preliminary to being born of the Spirit [I believe the words "born of water" in John 3:5 refer to water baptism, which was quite prominent in that setting. Not only was John the Baptist baptizing (even Jesus was baptized by him), but Jesus (through His disciples) was also baptizing in water (John 1:25-34; 3:22-26; 4:1, 2). The baptism of John 3:5 is a baptism of repentance and faith. Regarding the Biblical pattern that the lifegiving, sanctifying, gift-­dispensing Spirit typically comes to believers immediately after, and in close association with, water baptism, see pages 126, 127 in Holiness and Victory Over Sin, including the notes. This reference also discusses Titus 3:5, another verse that apparently views water baptism as a preliminary to receiving the Spirit (not that there isn't room for exceptions to this pattern, cf. Acts 10:44-48).]; and 1 Pet. 3:21 even speaks of baptism saving us. As I mentioned, I'm not suggesting that these things (like forgiveness, dying to the old man, etc.) can't be received apart from water baptism, but baptism seems to be the most appropriate (Biblical) occasion to complete these transactions. [We must continue to walk in the Spirit by faith (based on what God has said in His Word) throughout the rest of our lives on the earth, which is far from being automatic or always easy.]

I believe it's necessary for us to understand that water baptism is meaningful and effective only if it's accompanied by the following indispensable things: We must hear the gospel and understand it (we must at least understand the basics of the gospel); we must repent and submit to the gospel (and God Himself) in faith; and we must have all the necessary work of the Holy Spirit (like His drawing, convicting, revealing, regenerating, and sanctifying work). Without these things water baptism is nothing more than another dead ritual. Some other verses to consider on water baptism are Matt. 3:112, 1317; 28:19; Mark 16:16; Acts 2:41; 8:36-39; 9:18; 10:47, 48; 19:5; and Eph. 4:5." This is the end of the nine-page discussion regarding being baptized in the Spirit and water baptism under 1 Cor. 12:12-13. We are still under section 11.3 of this paper.

2 Corinthians 1:22. [God] who also sealed us and gave us the Spirit in our hearts as a pledge [down payment on our full inheritance in Christ, which includes our being glorified and reigning with God and His Son forever]. When we become born-again Christians, the Spirit of life, righteousness, and holiness comes to dwell "in our hearts." And in giving us the Spirit to dwell in our hearts, God is putting His "seal" upon us ["who also sealed us"] demonstrating and confirming that He has accepted us as His people. On our being sealed by God by giving us the Holy Spirit also see Eph. 1:13.

2 Corinthians 3:6. [God] who also made us adequate as servants of a new covenant, not of the letter [the letter of the Mosaic Law of the old covenant that could not provide the new birth by the indwelling Spirit of life] but of the Spirit; for the letter kills [in that it (the Law, the letter of the Law) intensifies the sin problem; for one thing it aroused the desire for sinful fruit (cf. Rom. 7:5, 8, 11); for another thing, sin was a lot more serious when you sinned against the commandments given by God (cf. Rom. 4:15; 5:13, 20; 1 Cor. 15:56).], but the Spirit gives life [starting with the new birth wrought by the indwelling, life-giving Spirit]. There is no new-covenant salvation apart from the life-giving, sanctifying work of the indwelling Spirit of God. 

Galatians 3:2, 14. This is the only thing I want to find out from you: did you receive the Spirit by the works of the Law, or by hearing with faith. It is clear that Paul and the Galatian Christians received the Spirit through submitting to Christ and the gospel "with faith," not through having done "works of the [Mosaic] Law." This verse in the Epistle to the Galatians is quite instructive for our topic: It is easy to see what Paul meant by "receive the Spirit" in the context of the Epistle to the Galatians. There was only one reception of the Spirit by the Galatian Christians, and it included being born of the Spirit (Gal. 2:20; 4:5-7, 23, 29; 5:25), walking with the victory over sin through the Spirit (see the next listing: Gal. 5:5, 16-25), and the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work (Gal. 3:5). It seems impossible that the Galatian Christians could think that Paul was limiting the meaning of receiving the Spirit here to the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work.  

Galatians 3:14 also is very instructive in that it shows that receiving the Spirit is tied to God's promise of the Spirit, which, as I have shown, included the new birth and life by the Spirit, holiness and victory over sin by the Spirit, and the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work. WE CAN ONLY RECEIVE BY FAITH WHAT GOD GIVES BY GRACE! I'll quote Galatians 3:14. in order that in Christ Jesus the blessing of Abraham might come to the Gentiles ["Nations" would probably be a better translation than "Gentiles," which would include the blessing coming to Jewish believers too. Anyway, it is clear that salvation in Christ has been given to all believers, Jewish and Gentile believers.], so that we ["We" clearly includes Jewish Christians in that Paul was Jewish.] would receive the promise of the Spirit through faith.

Galatians 5:5, 16-25. The dominant theme of these super-important verses is that Christians are called, and enabled, to walk in the righteousness and holiness of God, with the victory over all sin, through the all-important ministry of the indwelling Righteous, Holy Spirit of life. I'll quote Gal. 5:5, 16, 22-25, which are verses of key importance, not to minimize the importance of the other verses of chapter 5. I'll quote Galatians 5:5 (but only this one verse) from the Amplified Bible. I believe they (those who produced this amplified translation) get it right. (The brackets in this translation are theirs, not mine.) For we [not relying on the Law], through the [Holy] Spirit's [help] by faith anticipate and wait for the blessing and good for which our righteousness and right standing with God - our conformity to His will in purpose, thought and action - [causes us] to hope. Galatians 5:16. But I say, walk by the Spirit [on a continuous basis, by faith, in accordance with God's Word], and you will not [You most certainly will not (The Greek has an intensive negative here).] carry out the [sinful] desire of the flesh. The flesh/old man/sinful nature wants to do the sinful works of the flesh (see 5:19-21). Galatians 5:22-25. But the [righteous, holy, godly] fruit of [produced by] the [indwelling] Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, (23) gentleness, self-control; against such things there is no law. (24) Now those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh [In the ideal, the old man would be crucified (put to death) when we become Christians and kept from manifesting itself in sin as we walk by the Spirit on a continuous basis by faith (see Rom. 6:6; Gal. 5:16)] with its passions and desires [that are part of the flesh/old man/sinful nature]. (25) If we live by the Spirit [if we have spiritual/eternal life by the indwelling Spirit of life through new-covenant salvation in the blood of Christ], let us also walk [This is a different Greek verb than the one used in Gal. 5:16; I prefer a translation like let us also follow the Spirit.] by the Spirit. It doesn't come to pass automatically, but we are called, and enabled, to always walk by/follow after the Righteous, Holy Spirit in the righteousness and holiness of God, through faith.

Ephesians 3:16-17a. that He [God the Father] would grant you, according to the riches of His glory, to be strengthened with power through His Spirit in the inner man [His Spirit dwells in every born-again Christian (Rom. 8:9). This empowering will enable us to understand God's Word, to resist doubt and be strong in faith as we cooperate with the saving, sanctifying grace of God in Christ and live in the righteousness and holiness of God.], (17) so that Christ may [fully] dwell [Christ is dwelling in every born-again Christian by the Spirit; we need for Him to fully dwell (live) in our hearts by the Spirit through faith.] in your hearts through faith [The Greek has the definite article (which is similar to our English word "the") before the word faith. Apparently the idea is that the strengthening through God's Spirit in the inner man of 3:16 enables us to be strong in faith, with the result that Christ may fully dwell in our hearts enabling us to live in the center of God's will in His truth, righteousness, and holiness. Anyway, it is clear that the indwelling Righteous, Holy Spirit enables us to live in the righteousness and holiness of God with the victory over all sin. God hates all sin and He paid an infinite price in the Sacrifice of His Son to save us, which includes the Son's earning the right for us to receive and walk in the Life-Giving, Righteous, Holy Spirit of God.

Ephesians 4:23. This verse is extremely important. For one thing, the apostle Paul shows in this verse how we are enabled to put off the sinful old man/the flesh/the sinful nature of Eph. 4:22 and to put on the righteous and holy new man and live in the righteousness and holiness of God of Eph. 4:24. I'll quote Eph. 4:23, but I believe this translation of the NASB can be greatly improved: and that you be renewed in the Spirit of your mind. The Greek could be translated this way, but I'm confident that Paul did not intend the translation given here for the second half of this verse. I agree with those scholars who translate and that you be renewed by the Spirit in your thinking [or, in your mind]. We have to think right (to think in line with the will and Word of God) in our hearts in order to live right, and the indwelling Spirit enables us to think right (but we must always yield to and cooperate with the indwelling Spirit by faith). Thinking right in our hearts by the enablement of the indwelling Spirit is required for us to walk by the Spirit of Gal. 5:16. The most important cross-reference for us to understand what it means to think right by the indwelling Spirit is Rom. 8:5-9, which is discussed above, as part of Rom. 8:1-17.

2 Thessalonians 2:13-14. But we should always give thanks to God for you, brethren beloved by the Lord [the Lord Jesus], because God [God the Father] has chosen you from the beginning [cf., e. g., Eph. 1:4] for salvation through sanctification by the Spirit and faith in the truth. [[One dominant point I am making throughout this section (11.3) is that there is no new-covenant salvation apart from the life-giving work of the Spirit (which isn't specifically mentioned here) and His all-important sanctifying work. And it must be understood that this totally necessary life-giving, sanctifying work takes place after we, as individuals, receive the Spirit, the Spirit who was first poured out on the Day of Pentecost. (The Spirit does some necessary, preliminary work in our hearts, including convicting, revealing, etc. before He comes to dwell in our hearts.) Many passages make it clear that the outpouring of the Spirit that started on the Day of Pentecost also includes the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work.]] (14) It was for this He called you through our gospel [We must answer God's call with faith ("faith in the truth" of the gospel [2 Thess. 2:13]) and continue to walk by grace through faith on a continuous basis or God's will not be accomplished in and through us).], that you may gain the glory of our Lord Jesus Christ. [We are saved from eternal destruction and taken to share in the eternal glory of the Lord Jesus Christ. Being sanctified by the Spirit makes us ready to stand before God in judgment, whenever that takes place.]

Titus 3:5-7. He [God the Father] saved us, not on the basis of deeds [works] which we have done in righteousness [Some misunderstand the apostle Paul here. He insisted that we must have the works of righteousness that the grace (including the work of the indwelling Spirit of God) enables us to do. But he was strongly against any works of/from ourselves (in the flesh) trying to earn salvation, or for which we could boast in ourselves (pride with unbelief is at the root of sin). God must get all the glory for the Sacrifice of His Son and the works that His Spirit/grace enables us to do. I'll quote Eph. 2:10, "For we are His [God the Father's] workmanship, created in Christ Jesus [and very much including the sanctifying work of the Holy Spirit] for good works, which God prepared beforehand so that we would walk in them." We have to walk in them by God's enabling grace through faith.], but according to His mercy [His mercy and His grace go together.], by the washing of regeneration [Regeneration is another word for being born again. The New Testament makes it clear that we are born again by the Holy Spirit of life, and I have demonstrated that there is no new-covenant salvation apart from being born again. The promised new-covenant salvation wasn't fully available until the Lamb had been slain, resurrected, and taken up to the right hand of God the Father, where He received from the Father the promised Holy Spirit to pour out on those who repent and submit to God the Father, the Lord Jesus, and the gospel.] and renewing [renewal] by the Holy Spirit [We are made righteous and holy new creations by the poured out, indwelling Righteous, Holy Spirit of life. I agree with the many commentators who understand "regeneration" and "renewal" to be essentially equivalent in meaning here.], (6) whom He [God the Father] poured out on us richly through Jesus Christ our Savior [As we have seen, the Father gave the promised Spirit to the Lord Jesus, who poured out the Spirit, starting on the Day of Pentecost (Acts 2:33)]. (7) so that being justified by His grace ["Justified" is being used in a full sense here that includes being forgiven, declared righteous, born again, and made righteous and holy with the victory over sin. The longest chapter in my book Holiness and Victory Over Sin deals with the meaning of justify/justification, and I dealt with the meaning of this super-important New Testament word in my book Righteousness, Holiness, and Victory Over Sin. Both books are available on amazon.com. I recommend the latter book first, because it was taken from radio broadcasts and is easier to read, but the other book contains quite a bit of information not available in the latter book.] we would be made heirs according to the hope of eternal life. [The word "hope" shows that Paul is looking to the future when we will be glorified and receive/inherit the fullness of eternal life, which includes being glorified.] This completes the listing of passages in this section (11.3) of this paper.      

Receiving the Spirit; being baptized in the Spirit; God's giving the Spirit; the outpouring of the Spirit; etc. is not pictured in the New Testament as a second experience that one receives after having become a Christian. It is a very necessary part of becoming a new-covenant Christian. It is very significant, as I have demonstrated, that the prophecies/promises regarding the pouring out of the Holy Spirit almost always put the emphasis on the life-giving, sanctifying work of the Spirit, not on the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work, but that is clearly included (Joel 2:28-29 with Acts 2:17-18). The charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work is very important to the proper functioning of the Body of Christ (see 1 Corinthians chapter 12, for example), very much including equipping Christians, especially ministers, to carry out their ministries, and to effectively take the gospel to the world. The book of Acts puts a strong emphasis on the powerful charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work. For one thing, it is easy for people, very much including unbelievers, to see the things God does that are immediately visible before their eyes (and ears, etc.), but is not easy to see the things that God does in hearts and lives.

There is plenty of room to think of the Spirit's coming with power and spiritual gifts at a time after we become Christians (the new birth and becoming holy is a big part of what it means to be converted and become Christians), but I don't believe the New Testament speaks of believers receiving the Spirit in the charismatic dimension of His work, including the gifts of the Spirit, as an experience separate from becoming Christians any more than it speaks of the Spirit coming to fully sanctify us with an experience separate from becoming Christians. However, it is clear that God can distribute charismatic gifts to Christians at times long after they have become Christians and Christians can fully submit to the gospel in faith at a time after they become Christians and be sanctified (begin to live in an abiding state of holiness).

Becoming a Christian in the full sense presented in the New Testament includes being baptized in water and receiving the Spirit. (As I discussed above, receiving the Spirit in the typical New Testament pattern would follow, but be closely related to, being baptized in water after repenting and submitting in faith to God, His Son, and the gospel. However, as discussed above, most of the Christians I know do not follow this pattern, and my experience doesn't follow it either. Anyway, this is a topic that we should prayerfully consider.) Receiving the Spirit in His new-covenant fullness includes the new birth, the sanctifying work of the Spirit, and the charismatic dimension of His work that enables the Body of Christ to function as it should and to take the gospel to the world. It is clear in our day that many Christians receive the Spirit in the charismatic dimension (including the charismatic gifts of 1 Corinthians chapter 12) at a time long after they became born-again Christians, which is quite appropriate if they haven't already received the Spirit in that dimension. However, I don't believe the New Testament speaks of receiving the Spirit (whether in the life-giving, sanctifying sense, or in the charismatic gift-giving sense) as an experience separate from becoming a Christian. I'll comment further on this important point further as we continue, and I have already discussed this important point quite a bit above in this paper.

11.4. I'll Comment on Believers Receiving the Spirit in Acts 8:4-24; 9:1-19; 10:30-48 with 11:17; and 19:1-7. (We have already discussed Acts 2 and the Day of Pentecost.) I don't believe any of these passages speak of believers receiving the Spirit as a second experience (separated from what it meant to become new-covenant Christians) whether to fully sanctify them (entire sanctification), or as a second experience to receive the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work. All of these receptions of the Spirit (and what took place on the Day of Pentecost, which is discussed above, and which I'll briefly discuss here) are part of what was involved in becoming new-covenant believers - Christians. I don't believe any of these passages speak of believers being born again by the Spirit of life, or fully sanctified until they received the Righteous, Holy Spirit as pictured in these passages.

The most appropriate Biblical occasion for new-covenant believers to receive the Holy Spirit is right after, and in close association with, water baptism, sometimes (or quite often) with the laying on of hands. See Acts 2:37-39. I'll quote Acts 2:38, Peter said to them, "Repent, and each of you be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins; and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit." ((For one important thing, we would typically put "forgiveness" [also see Acts 22:16] and dying with Christ and being buried with Him (Rom. 6:3-4; Col. 2:12) before receiving the spiritual resurrecting, life-giving, sanctifying Spirit. However, I'm not suggesting, nor do I believe, that God cannot, or does not, allow the widespread viewpoint of our day, that we are born again before we are baptized in water. (It's clear that we must have repented and submitted to the gospel in faith [have become believers] before we are baptized in water.) That's what I was taught and what happened in my case, but we ought to make it a priority to line up with the Bible the best that we can. We could say, as many do say, that receiving the Spirit is a separate, second experience, but I believe it is more accurate (according to the New Testament) to think of the one full-orbed experience of becoming Christians according to the typical New Testament pattern. The Lord Jesus Christ Himself established this pattern in that He received the Spirit right after He was baptized in water by John the Baptist (see Matt. 3:13-17; Mark 1:9-11: Luke 3:21-22; and John 1:29-34). He didn't need to be born again or made holy like we do, but He did need to receive the Spirit to become the Messiah/Christ (the Anointed One; the One Anointed with the Spirit).

The case of the Samaritans, Acts 8:4-24, fits this sequence, but it is a little different in that they did not receive the Spirit until a few days after they submitted to the gospel in faith and were baptized in water through the ministry of Phillip (Acts 8:12; 14-17). Now when the apostles in Jerusalem heard that Samaria had received the word of God, they sent them Peter and John, who came down and prayed for them that they might receive the Holy Spirit (Acts 8:14-15). That case was quite special in that those converts were Samaritans (Acts 8:5, 14), and there was much strife between the Jews and Samaritans. Peter and John could verify that everything was in order (assuming it was) and put their stamp of approval on what was happening there. The Samaritan believers received the Holy Spirit through the laying on of the hands of the apostles.

We could say that the Samaritan believers were "saved" before they received the Spirit, but they had not yet become Christians in the full new-covenant sense, and they could not begin to walk as Christians are enabled, and required, to walk. Receiving the life-giving, sanctifying Spirit who enables us to be born again and to walk in the righteousness and holiness of God, along with the charismatic dimension of the work of the Spirit is a big part of what Christianity is all about. It was totally necessary for the Samaritan believers to receive the Spirit to partake of new-covenant salvation.

It is obvious that Christians can receive the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work as a second experience. Up until a little more than a hundred years ago, most Christians were not open to (they did not have faith to receive much of) the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work. (I believe we can also say that God intended more of the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work at the beginning and end of this age.) But this is not the pattern established in the New Testament. Not only was the life-giving and sanctifying work of the Spirit needed to become born-again, sanctified Christians, but the grace to enable the Christian church to fully function as it is supposed to, and to effectively take the gospel to the world, requires the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work. This includes the charismatic gifts. Charismatic gifts were mentioned in receiving the Spirit on the Day of Pentecost and in Acts 10:46; 19:6. We know that the apostle Paul (who received the Spirit in Acts 9) spoke with tongues a lot (1 Cor. 14:18), and I believe we can safely assume (without being dogmatic) that the Samaritan Christians that we read about in Acts chapter 8 began to experience the charismatic gifts when  they received the Spirit. And Acts 10:45 says, "the gift of the Holy Spirit" that had been poured out on the Day of Pentecost was poured out on the Gentile believers gathered at the home of Cornelius (also, referring to the same experience, Acts 10:47 ["received the Holy Spirit"]; Acts 11:15 ["the Holy Spirit fell upon them just as He did upon us in the beginning"]). The Holy Spirit brought His life-giving and sanctifying work that these Gentile believers totally needed along with the charismatic dimension of His work. 

The case of the conversion of Saul/Paul and his baptism in water and reception of the Spirit was a little different in that he had been sent to Damascus to persecute the Christians there (not to become a Christian), but what happened to him fit the familiar pattern in most ways (Acts 9:1-22). Acts 9:10-18 show that the Lord Jesus sent Ananias to Paul that he might be filled with the Spirit and regain his sight. Keep in mind that Paul desperately needed the life-giving and sanctifying work of the Spirit. (Ananias also informed Paul that his apostolic ministry would include much suffering.) The water baptism of Paul isn't mentioned in Acts chapter 9, but it is mentioned in Acts 22:16 that Ananius said to Paul, "Get up and be baptized and wash away your sins, calling on His [the Lord Jesus'] name." I assume Paul was baptized in water before he received the Spirit, which would fit the typical pattern (you would typically "wash away your sins" before you receive the Spirit), but with room for exceptions as we will see when we come to Acts 10 next. Paul probably received the Spirit with the laying on of the hands of Ananias, but that detail isn't mentioned in Acts. Acts 9:17-18 with Acts 9:12 make it clear that Paul regained his sight when Ananias laid his hands on him. Acts 9:12 mentions that Paul "has seen in a vision a man named Ananius come in and lay hands on him, so that he might regain his sight."

The case of the conversion of Cornelius the centurion and "his relatives and close friends" (Acts 10:24; see Acts 10:1-11:18) is a little different in that those believers received the Spirit before they were baptized in water, but that deviation from the typical pattern is easy to understand in that special case. The conversion of Cornelius and the others gathered to hear what God had to say to them through the apostle Peter was different in that they were the first Gentiles to become Christians mentioned in the New Testament. If God had not demonstrated His full acceptance of these Gentiles (uncircumcised Gentiles [Acts 11:3]) as full members of the Body of Christ by obviously giving them the Holy Spirit, very large numbers of Jewish Christians would have doubted their salvation and rejected fellowship with them. (The New Testament shows that some Jewish Christians doubted the salvation of Gentiles if they were not circumcised, etc.) 

God clearly demonstrated His full acceptance of these believers by pouring out the Holy Spirit on them while Peter was still speaking, and they were speaking in tongues as on the Day of Pentecost. If God had not demonstrated His acceptance of these Gentile believers they undoubtedly would not have baptized them in water (Acts 10:45-48). Acts 11:1-18 shows that God's pouring out His Spirit on these Gentiles, along with the other things God had revealed to Peter, was totally needed to satisfy (at least to some extent) the Jewish Christians at Jerusalem that God accepted these Gentiles (though uncircumcised, etc. [Acts 11:3]). So, it is easy to see why God gave the gift of the Spirit to these believers before they were baptized in water.

And lastly, we'll briefly discuss Acts 19:1-7. What happened there fits the typical pattern in that the converts repented (as required) and submitted to the gospel in faith. Then they were baptized in water, Paul laid his hands on them, and they received the Spirit. Acts 19:6 mentions that they began speaking with tongues and prophesying. The primary point that we need to discuss is whether these "disciples" that Paul found when he came to Ephesus were born-again Christians when he met them. Many say yes, but it seems clear to me, and many others, that had not become Christians yet. When the apostle Paul asked them if they had received the Spirit when they believed, they answered, "No, we have not even heard whether there is a Holy Spirit." Those last words would be impossible for born-again Christians to speak. In the margin the NASB has, "Or, the Holy Spirit has been given." However we translate these words, I believe it is clear that these disciples of John the Baptist would have known about the Holy Spirit, but they did not know that He had been poured out for those who submit to Christ to receive, typically right after being baptized in water, or that receiving the Spirit is a very big part of becoming a Christian. The Spirit brings life (starting with the new birth) that overpowers spiritual death; He enables Christians to live righteous and holy lives, with the victory over sin; and He brings the charismatic dimension of His work, which includes anointing believers to fulfill their assigned roles, including ministries, in the Body of Christ.

When Paul asked them into what [name] they were baptized, they said "Into John's [John the Baptist's] baptism." As I mentioned, it seems clear to me that they had not yet become Christians. This is strongly confirmed in that Paul went on to tell them "John baptized with the baptism of repentance, telling the people to believe in [or, into] Him who was coming after him, that is Jesus" (Acts 19:4). They hadn't believed in [or, into] the Lord Jesus. And 19:5 goes on to say "When they heard this, they were baptized in the name of the Lord Jesus." We can be sure that Paul would have made sure they knew the truth about salvation in Christ and submitted to, and confessed, that truth in faith before he would have baptized them. Acts 19:6-7. And when Paul had laid his hands upon them, the Holy Spirit came on them, and they began speaking with tongues and prophesying. (7) There were in all about twelve men.           

11.5. The Third Wave Pentecostals (Including John Wimber and the Vineyard Churches) Teach that All Born-Again Christians Have Been Baptized in the Holy Spirit, that It Isn't a Second Experience, and Further Discussion Regarding Receiving the Holy Spirit/Baptism in the Holy Spirit. This section includes a listing and quotation of the verses of the thirteen uses of receiving the Spirit (in some form) and the eleven uses of giving the Spirit (in some form) that I found in the New Testament: It is quite significant that each one of these uses can, and undoubtedly should, be understood in the same full sense as the seven uses of baptism in the Spirit in the New Testament that include being born again, being sanctified, and the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work, through the one primary reception, giving, and baptism in the Holy Spirit. I am trying to demonstrate how the New Testament uses these three expressions. However, I am not at all denying later givings/anointings with the Spirit. 

I'll quote a little from my 2001, thirty-seven-page paper titled Charismatic Gifts and Charismatic Chaos. (I don't have the paper in digital format, but I have some printed copies of the paper. The paper contains a large number of excerpts, and I didn't receive permission to put the excerpts on the internet.) A primary purpose for the paper was to disagree with John MacArthur's view that the charismatic gifts have not been available since the early days of the Christian church, and are not available in our day. I have a lot of respect for MacArthur's ministry, but I believe he is making a serious mistake here, very much including when he denies that the gifts being manifested in our day are genuine gifts from God.

I'll quote a small part of what I said under the heading, "Excerpts from Are Miraculous Gifts for Today ([Zondervan, 1996]. Four views are presented in this book: Cessationist; Open but Cautious; Third Wave; and Pentecostal/Charismatic. The book was edited by Wayne Grudem.)." (I'll quote footnote 24 of my thirty-seven page paper: "I'll quote the paragraph from the Preface in which Grudem briefly defines what is meant by the Third Wave: 'In the 1980s a third renewal movement arose [following the Pentecostal and charismatic renewal movements], a movement called The Third Wave by missions professor C. Peter Wagner at Fuller Seminary.... Third wave people encourage the equipping of all believers to use New Testament spiritual gifts today and say that the proclamation of the gospel should ordinarily be accompanied by "signs, wonders, and miracles," according to the New Testament pattern. They teach, however, that baptism in the Holy Spirit happens to all Christians in conversion and that subsequent experiences are better called "fillings"; or "empowerings" with the Holy Spirit. Though they believe the gift of tongues exists today, they do not emphasize it to the extent that Pentecostals and charismatics do. The most prominent representative of the "Third Wave" is John Wimber [now deceased], a pastor of the Vineyard Christian Fellowship in Anaheim, California, and leader of the Association of Vineyard Churches.' ")

"I'll start with some excerpts from C. Stanley Storms, who represents the Third Wave viewpoint in Are Miraculous Gifts for Today: 'It is my contention in this chapter that we should pray for his [the Holy Spirit's] appearance with the expectation that he will minister to God's people through God's people by means of the full range of charismata [gifts] listed in such passages as 1 Corinthians 12:7-10, 28-30. This has not always been my [Storm's] belief. For over fifteen years I taught others that certain gifts of the Spirit, in particular, word of knowledge, healing, miracles, prophecy, discerning of spirits, tongues, and the interpretation of tongues died with the apostles and were interred with their bones' (page 175)."

"Storms' heading for pages 176-185 is 'Second Experiences.' I'll quote three paragraphs from what he said here: 'Perhaps the principal distinction, theologically speaking, between classical Pentecostalism and the so-called Third Wave is the latter's rejection of the doctrine of subsequence. According to most Pentecostals and charismatics, baptism in the Holy Spirit is an event subsequent to and therefore separate from the reception of the Spirit at conversion [which includes being born again], the initial evidence of which [baptism in the Holy Spirit] is speaking in tongues.

The view for which I [Storms] will contend is that Spirit baptism is a metaphor that describes what happens when one becomes a Christian. [[(I have a lengthy, seven-paragraph footnote here. I'll quote part of it when I finish quoting from Storms.) As my present paper shows, I agree that the terminology baptism in the Spirit, as it is used in the New Testament, includes "what happens [or, at least what is supposed to happen] when one becomes a Christian." But I cannot agree if baptism in the Spirit is not understood to include the transformation to righteous and holy living by the indwelling Righteous, Holy Spirit, along with being born again by the Life-Giving Spirit and entering into the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work.]] However, this does not preclude multiple, subsequent experiences of the Spirit's activity. After conversion the Spirit may yet 'come' with varying degrees of intensity, wherein the Christian is 'overwhelmed,' 'empowered,' or in some sense 'endued.'  ... (page 176).

Whereas biblical usage suggests that we apply the terminology of Spirit baptism to the conversion experience of all believers, this in no way restricts the activity of the Spirit to conversion. [The only way I can agree with this sentence is if we understand that "conversion" includes being born again, the transformation to righteous and holy living to which we are called in the gospel, and the charismatic dimension of the Holy Spirit's work.] ... Therefore evangelicals are right in affirming that all Christians have experienced Spirit-baptism at conversion [[They have at least experienced a major aspect of what Spirit-baptism means in the New Testament when they are born again, but it is totally necessary to understand that the sanctifying/making righteous work of the Spirit is a big part of what the baptism in the Spirit means in the New Testament. We cannot afford to minimize this all-important part of our salvation. As I demonstrate in this 2019 paper, most of the prophecies that deal with God's pouring out of His Spirit in new-covenant salvation put the emphasis on our being made righteous and holy.]], but they are wrong in denying the reality of subsequent, sensible, and often dramatic experiences of the Spirit in the course of the Christian life. Charismatics are right in affirming the reality of postconversion encounters with the Spirit that empower, enlighten, and transform. But they are wrong in calling this experience 'Spirit baptism.' [At least such experiences should not be called the baptism in the Holy Spirit.] ... (page 179)."

I'll quote most of what I have in the lengthy footnote 25 of my paper Charismatic Gifts and Charismatic Chaos: "I believe Storm's viewpoint (which is the Third Wave viewpoint; see footnote 24) comes much closer to what baptism in the Spirit means in the New Testament than the typical Pentecostal/charismatic viewpoint (where the baptism in the Spirit is viewed as being subsequent to the new birth, not including the all-important new birth), but I believe we must modify his viewpoint somewhat to fully line up with the New Testament. The New Testament uses the words baptism in the [Holy] Spirit (in some form) seven times (Matt. 3:11; Mark 1:8; Luke 3:16; John 1:33; Acts 1:5; 11:16; and 1 Cor. 12:13). All seven uses speak of the promised new-covenant gift of the Holy Spirit. The Spirit is given to all who believe in/into the Lord Jesus Christ to impart life (starting with the new birth), to enable Christians to be righteous and holy, and to enable Christians to function in the charismatic dimension.

Those who become born-again Christians necessarily experience a major aspect of what baptism in the Spirit means in the New Testament, but we haven't received the fullness of what baptism in the Spirit means if we (for one reason or another) haven't been sanctified/made holy by the Spirit, or if (for one reason or another) we have failed to enter the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work. One key reason that many Christians in our day enter the charismatic dimension of the Spirit's work as a second (subsequent) experience (and that many Christians never do enter this dimension of the Spirit's work) is that they hadn't/haven't learned that this dimension of His work is available for us today, or they had/have even been taught against the charismatic gifts for our day.

I have discussed baptism in the Spirit at some length in previous writings. Start with the discussion of 1 Cor. 12:13 in my paper dated March 2000 that includes verse-by-verse studies of 1 Corinthians chapters 10-14, including the subsection titled "Further Discussion on the Meaning of the Words Baptism in the Holy Spirit in the New Testament (pages 29-31 and 36-40 for the internet version [Google to Karl Kemp Teaching].) In footnote 9 on page 29 of that paper, I cite references to further discussion on this important topic from my book Holiness and Victory Over Sin (pages 125-139) and the Paper on Faith (pages 94-100 for the internet version of that paper). To get the full picture it will be necessary to read all three discussions. This topic is controversial; that makes it all the more important. We must seek God for the balanced truth of what the Bible teaches. Most Christians assume that what they believe is the balanced truth already; but those holding differing viewpoints can't all be right. Very often we have part of the truth, not the whole truth/the balanced truth.

[For this 2019 paper I expanded on what I had in the lengthy footnote 25 of my paper Charismatic Gifts and Charismatic Chaos by quoting the relevant verses here.] There are other expressions used in the New Testament with the same meaning as baptism in the Spirit, including the words receive the Spirit. I found thirteen verses that use the words receive the Spirit (in some form). It seems that these words in each of these verses fit the idea of receiving the promised new-covenant Spirit, the Spirit who comes to impart the life of God (starting with the new birth), to make believers righteous and holy, and to enable them to function in the charismatic dimension. As I always do, unless I mention otherwise, I am using the NASB. All of the verses use the Greek verb lambano (John 7:39 with 7:37-38. [See under section 11.3 of this 2019 paper on these verses.] Now on the last day, the great day of the feast [of Tabernacles], Jesus stood and cried out saying, "If anyone is thirsty, let him come to me and drink. (38) He who believes in Me, as the Scripture said, 'From his innermost being will flow rivers of living water.' " (39) But this He spoke of the Spirit, whom those who believed in Him were to receive; for the Spirit was not yet given, because Jesus was not yet glorified. Jesus was not glorified in the sense spoken of here until He was taken up in glory forty days after His resurrection [cf. Acts 1:2; 2:33].); John 14:16-17 ([See under section 11.3 on these verses.] I will ask the Father, and He will give you another Helper [Greek parakletos], that He may be with you forever; that is the Spirit of truth, whom the world cannot receive, because it does not see Him or know Him, but you know Him because He abides with you and will be in you. Jesus, speaking of the time when His disciples would receive the Spirit (starting on the Day of Pentecost), said, 'because I live, you will live also' [John 14:19]. When Christ spoke these words to His disciples, they had not been born again yet.) John 20:22 with 19-23 ([See under section 11.3 on these verses.] And when He [Jesus] had said this, He breathed on them and said to them, "Receive the Holy Spirit."); Acts 2:38 with 2:37-39 ([See under section 11.3 on these verses.] Peter said to them, "Repent, and each of you be baptized in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins; and you will receive the gift of the Holy Spirit."); Acts 8:15, 17, 19 ([The apostles Peter and John] who came down and prayed for them that they might receive the Holy Spirit. (17) Then they began laying their hands on them, and they were receiving the Holy Spirit. (19) [Simon, "who was formerly practicing magic in the city" (Acts 8:9)] saying, "Give this authority to me as well, so that everyone on whom I lay my hands may receive the Holy Spirit."); Acts 10:47 ([The apostle Peter at the household of Cornelius said] "Surely no one can refuse the water for these to be baptized who have received the Holy Spirit just as we did [on the Day of Pentecost], can he?"); Acts 19:2 with 19:1-7 ([See under section 11.4 on these verses.] He [the apostle Paul] said to them, "Did you receive the Holy Spirit when you believed?" And they said to him, "No, we have not even heard whether there is a Holy Spirit [or, better, the Holy Spirit has been given]."); Rom. 8:15 (For you have not received a spirit of slavery leading to fear again, but you have received a spirit [I would translate the Spirit with the margin of the NASB and the NIV, KJV] of adoption as sons by which we cry out, "Abba! Father!"); 1 Cor. 2:12 (Now we have received, not the spirit of the world, but the Spirit who is from God, so that we may know the things freely given to us by God.); Gal. 3:2 ([See under section 11.3 in this paper on this verse.] This is the only thing I want to find out from you; did you receive the Spirit by the works of the Law, or by hearing with faith? It is clear that they received the Spirit through Faith in God the Father, the Lord Jesus, and the gospel, not through doing works of the Law.); and Gal. 3:14 ([See under section 11.3 on this verse.] in order that in Christ Jesus the blessing of Abraham might come to the Gentiles [nations], so that we [all believers] would receive the promise of the Spirit through faith.).

I found eleven verses that use the words giving the Spirit (in some form) that fit the same full sense that is comparable with the meaning baptism in the Spirit and receiving the Spirit. All of these verses, with the obvious exception of John 7:39 where the verb must be supplied in italics, use the Greek verb didomi. I won't count John 7:39 since the verb is not included in the Greek text.) John 7:39 with 7:37-38 (See in the preceding paragraph on John 7:39.); John 14:16-17 (See in the preceding paragraph on John 14:16.); Acts 5:32 with 5:27-42 (And we are witnesses of these things; and so is the Holy Spirit, whom God has given to those who obey Him.) Acts 8:18 (cf. 8:20; When Simon saw that the Spirit was bestowed [given] through the laying on of the apostle's hands....); Acts 11:17 (Therefore if God gave to them [referring to the Gentiles who became Christians in Acts chapter 10] the same gift as He gave to us also after believing in the Lord Jesus Christ, who was I that I could stand in God's way? [by refusing to accept these Gentile believers and baptize them in water]); Acts 15:8 with 15:1-11 (And God, who knows the heart, testified to them giving them the Holy Spirit [referring to the Gentile believers being given the Spirit back in Acts chapter 10], just as He also did to us [referring back to the Day of Pentecost].); Rom. 5:5 with 5:1-11 (and hope does not disappoint, because the love of God has been poured out within [into] our heats through the Holy Spirit who was given to us. See pages 89-91 of my book Holiness and Victory Over Sin); 2 Cor. 1:22 ([God] who also sealed us and gave us the Spirit in our hearts as a pledge [down payment on the glory of our inheritance that is still future].); 2 Cor. 5:5 (Now He who prepared us for this very purpose is God, who gave to us the Spirit as a pledge [downpayment; see 2 Cor. 1:22].); 1 Thess. 4:8 with 4:1-8 (So He who rejects this is not rejecting man but the God who gives His Holy Spirit to you.); 1 John 3:24 (The One who keeps His commandments [referring to God the Father as 1 John 3:23 shows] abides in Him [God the Father], and He [God the Father] in him. We know by this that He abides in us, by the Spirit whom He [God the Father] has given us.); and 1 John 4:13 ([By this we know that we abide in Him and He in us because He has given us of His Spirit [1 John 4:9-12 and other verses show that God the Father is spoken of here.]).

This is the end of this paper. May God's will be fully accomplished through this paper and His people be edified and blessed! May this paper help many Christians to better understand holiness and walk in an abiding state of holiness through the blood of Christ and in the outpoured, indwelling Life-Giving, Righteous, Holy Spirit of God!

Karl Kemp, March, 2019

Copyright © by Karl Kemp                              

http://www.karlkempteachingministries.com Karl Kemp worked as an engineer in the space field throughout the 60s. He became a born-again Christian in 1964. He received an MA in Biblical Studies in 1972. He has been a Bible teacher for 45 years. See the website for more info on his books, papers, etc.

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