FREE CHRISTIAN REPRINT ARTICLES
Christian Articles for All of your Publishing Needs!
LIKE US
Translate this Page Here








HOME
Free Daily Devotional
and Verse for Your
Website or Blog

FOR WRITERS

Member Login
Submit Articles
Manage Articles
Writer Benefits
Author Terms
Writer Help
More Writer Help
FOR READERS

Recent Articles
Browse Articles
Search Articles
Search Writers
FOR PUBLISHERS

Ezines / Email Alerts
Manage Subscriptions
Terms of Service
MORE ARTICLES
ON OUR MAIN SITE










Word Count: 1091 Use Article For Free Send Article To Friend Print Article

ANNIE AND VANIE'S FIRST REAL PRAYER
by Mimi Rothschild  
11/30/2011 / Family


Two sisters, one about five years of age, the other one older, were
accustomed to go each Saturday morning, some distance from home, to get
chips and shavings from a cooper shop.

One morning with basket well filled, they were returning home when the
elder one was taken suddenly sick with cramps or cholera. She was in
great pain, and unable to proceed, much less to bear the basket home.
She sat down on the basket, and the younger one held her from falling.

The street was a lonely one occupied by workshops, factories, etc. Every
one was busy within; not a person was seen on the street.

The little girls were at a loss what to do. Too timid to go into any
workshop, they sat a while, as silent and quiet as the distressing pains
would allow.

Soon the elder girl said: "You know, Annie, that a good while ago Mother
told us that if we ever got into trouble we should pray and, God would
help us. Now you help me to get down upon my knees, and hold me up, and
we will pray."


There on the sidewalk, these two little children ask God to send
some one to help them home.

The simple and brief prayer over, the sick girl was again helped
up, and sat on the basket, waiting for the answers to their prayers.

Just then Annie saw, far down the street on the opposite side, a man
come out from a factory, look around him up and down the street and go
back into the factory.

"O sister, he has gone in again," said Annie. "Well," said Vanie, "perhaps
he is not the one God is going to send. If he is he will come back again."

"There he comes again," said Annie. "He walks this way. He seems looking
for something. He walks slow, and is without his hat. He puts his hand
to his head, as if he did not know what to do. Oh, sister, he has gone in
again; what shall we do?"

"That may not be the one whom God will send to help us," said Vanie. "If
he is, he will come out again."

"Oh yes, there he is; this time with his hat on," said Annie. "He comes
this way; he walks slowly, looking around on every side. He does not see
us, perhaps the trees hide us. Now he sees us, and is coming quickly."

A brawny German in broken accent asks:

"O children, what is the matter?"

"O sir," said Annie, Sister here is so sick she cannot walk and we cannot
get home."

"Where do you live my dear?"

"At the end of this street; you can see the house from here."

"Never mind," said the man, "I takes you home."

So the strong man gathered the sick child in his arms, and with her head
pillowed upon his shoulder, carried her to the place pointed out by the
younger girl. Annie ran around the house to tell her mother that there
was a man at the front door wishing to see her. The astonished mother,
with a mixture of surprise and joy, took charge of the precious burden
and the child was laid upon a bed.

After thanking the man, she expected him to withdraw, but instead, he
stood turning his hat in his hands as one who wishes to say something,
but knows not how to begin.

The mother observing this, repeated her thanks and finally said: "Would
you like me to pay you for bringing my child home?"

"Oh, no," said he with tears, "God pays me! God pays me! I would like
to tell you something, but I speak English so poorly that I fear you
will not understand."

The mother assured him that she was used to the German and could understand
him very well.

"I am the proprietor of an ink factory," said he. "My men work by the
piece. I have to keep separate accounts with each. I pay them every
Saturday. At twelve o'clock they will be at my desk for their money.
This week I have had many hindrances and was behind with my books. I was
working hard at them with the sweat on my face, in my great anxiety to
be ready in time. Suddenly I could not see the figures; the words in the
book all ran together, and I had a plain impression on my mind that some
one in the street wished to see me. I went out, looked up and down the
street, but seeing no one, went back to my desk and wrote a little.
Presently the darkness was greater than before, and the impression
stronger than before, that someone in the street needed me.

"Again I went out, looked up and down the street, walked a little way,
puzzled to know what I meant. Was my hard work and were the cares of
business driving me out of my wits? Unable to solve the mystery I turned
again into my shop and to my desk.

"This time my fingers refused to grasp the pen. I found myself unable
to write a word, or make a figure; but the impression was stronger than
ever on my mind, that someone needed my help. A voice seemed to say:
'Why don't you go out as I tell you? There is need of your help.' This
time I took my hat on going out, resolved to stay till I found out whether
I was losing my senses, or there was a duty for me to do. I walked some
distance without seeing anyone, and was more and more puzzled, till I
came opposite the children, and found that there was indeed need of my
help. I cannot understand it, madam."

As the noble German was about leaving the house, the younger girl had
the courage to say: "O mother, we prayed."

Thus the mystery was solved, and with tear-stained cheeks, a heaving
breast, and a humble, grateful heart, the kind man went back to his
accounts.

I have enjoyed many a happy hour in conversation with Annie in her own
house since she has a home of her own. The last I knew of Annie and Vanie
they were living in the same city, earnest Christian women. Their children
were growing up around them, who, I hope, will have like confidence in
mother, and faith in God.

Inspired by Jeigh Arrh.

Mimi Rothschild (www.Mim-Rothschild.org) is a mother of 8, grandmother of 4 and lifelong homeschooler. In 2001, she co-founded Learning By Grace (www.LearningByGrace.org), a Christian ministry that manages Online Homeschooling Programs such as The MorningStar Academy (www.TheMorningStarAcademy.org)

Article Source: http://www.faithwriters.com-CHRISTIAN WRITERS
If you died today, are you absolutely certain that you would go to heaven? You can be! Click here and TRUST JESUS NOW

Read more articles by Mimi Rothschild  

Like reading Christian Articles? Check out some more options. Read articles in Main Site Articles, Most Read Articles or our highly acclaimed Challenge Articles. Read Great New Release Christian Books for FREE in our Free Reads for Reviews Program. Or enter a keyword for a topic in the search box to search our articles.






HTML Guestbook is loading comments...



JOIN US at FaithWriters for Free. Grow as a Writer and Spread the Gospel.


The opinions expressed by authors do not necessarily reflect the opinion of FaithWriters.com.

Hire a Christian Writer, Christian Writer Wanted, Christian Writer Needed, Christian Content Needed
Find a Christian Editor, Hire a Christian Editor, Christian Editor, Find a Christian Writer



Main FaithWriters Site | Acceptable Use Policy

By using this site you agree to our Acceptable Use Policy .

© FaithWriters.com. All rights reserved.


FaithWriters.com Free Reprint Articles - Your place for Christian articles, Christian poems, Christian stories and much more.